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Squid Jig Design - The Red Jig

Red squid jig to be dismantled
In this example, I am dismantling a red "razorback" style squid jig. This type of jig has extra squid hooks in the centre of the jig. This jig had a swivel for connecting the jig to the fishing line but it has been damaged. I am not sure who manufactured this jig.

Removing the eyes
1) Firstly I removed the jig eyes. These are simply small nails (or tacks) and luminous beads.

Removing the eyes
2) Here you can see both eyes have been removed.

Removing the lead weight
3) Next I removed the lead weight. This is held in place by a small nail (or tack) which is visible just above the lead weight. It is only visible on one side of the jig since it only penetrates half way into the jig body.

Removing the lead weight
4) The nail has been removed.

Removing the lead weight
5) Once the nail is removed, it is possible to remove the lead weight. It tends to be jammed into the main body quite tightly.

Removing the razorback
6) Next I will remove the razorback squid hooks.

Removing the razorback
7) Here you can see I have removed one of the razorback hooks from the jig. Each hook consists of a piece of wire which has been bent in half and which has a needle point at each end.

Removing the razorback
8) Here you can see the 4 razorback hooks removed. Each has two needle points.

Removing cloth cover
9) Next I remove the cloth covering of the jig. I have turned the jig upside down, because the ends of the cloth cover are jammed into a groove running along the underside of the jig.

Removing cloth cover
10) I begin to peel away the cloth.

Removing cloth cover
11) Continuing to peel away the cloth, exposing the red plastic body underneath.

Removing cloth cover
12) Cloth has been removed.

Removing cloth cover
13) This is the topside of the cloth.

Removing swivel
14) Next I remove the swivel. (Please note that the swivel is damaged and this is why there is no ring for attaching the fishing line.)

Removing swivel
15) The swivel is attached to the jig with a piece of wire that is threaded through a hole in the plastic jig body. With some pliers, it is possible to unwind the wire connection.

Removing swivel
16) Here you can see the wire and swivel removed.

Removing squid hooks
17) Next I removed the squid hooks at the rear of the jig.

Removing squid hooks
18) The two rows of hooks are glued to a thin white stalk which has been glued into the red plastic body of the jig. Removing squid hooks
19) The hooks and white stalk were removed.

Removing squid hooks
20) Here you can see the white stalk is a bit more than twice as long as the squid hooks.

Jig body
21) Here you can see the underside of the red plactic body of the jig.

Jig body
22) This is the side view of the body.

Jig body
23) This is the top view. Note the four holes where the razorback hooks were placed.

Disassemble squid hooks
24) Next I disassembled the squid hooks. Note that the hooks consist of rows of needles with a metal sleeve holding them in place. The squid hooks are glued onto a white stalk.

Disassemble squid hooks
25) As you can see, there is a brown-colored glue or epoxy that has been applied to the base of the squid hooks.

Disassemble squid hooks
26) I removed the squid hooks from the white stalk by drilling out the stalk with a hand drill and a small drill tip. In order to remove the metal sleeve from the squid hooks, I decided to bend the needle points straight.

Disassemble squid hooks
27) Here you can see the needle points are almost straight.

Disassemble squid hooks
28) After straightening the needle hooks I was able to remove the sleeve by resting some pliers on the sleeve and knocking downward with a hammer. As you can see, the squid hooks consist of wires that have needle points at both ends and which has been bent in half.

Topics for discussion

A) How does the manufacturer manages to get the metal sleeve onto the jig hooks?

It seems to me that it would be too difficult to get the sleeve in place if the needles were already bent outward into the classic squid hook configuration. I suspect that the sleeve is installed first and then the needles are bent outward in a radial fashion.

B) Once the metal sleeve is in place, what stops the hooks from collapsing inwards?

The ring of squid hooks is actually hollow in the centre. The diagram below shows the configuration inside the sleeve - the sleeve is the black ring and the grey circles represent the wire needles. In the middle is just empty space. In the current example, the white stalk was inserted into this hollow space. However, the stalk is not needed for support. So why don't the needles just collapse inward due to the pressure exerted inward by the metal sleeve? I suspect that it does not collapse because the wire of the needles is distorted when the needles are bent outward (as discussed in point A). The wire bulges on the outer side (against the metal sleeve). This would result in a configuration not disimilar to an medieval archway. Archways were constructed of large stones that spanned large distances with no support from underneath. The reason the archways did not collapse was because the stones were effectively wedged against one another (Image of an archway).
Squid hook needles and sleeve
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Last modified: 21 March 2005